Category Archives: Programming

A Response to “Why Most Unit Testing is Waste”

A few months ago I came across the article Why Most Unit Testing is Waste by James O Coplien. The title is an accurate description of the contents – James considers most unit tests to be useless. He expands his arguments in the follow-up article. I was quite intrigued, since I get a lot of value from unit tests. How come we have such different views of them? Had I missed something? As it turns out, I was not persuaded by his arguments, and here is my response to the articles. Continue reading

What Makes a Good Programmer?

What makes a good programmer? It’s an interesting question to ask yourself. It makes you reflect on the craft of software development. It is also a good question to ask your colleagues. It can trigger some interesting discussions on how you work together. Here are five skills I think are crucial to have in order to be a good programmer.

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Switching from Java to Python – First Impressions

Three months ago I changed jobs, and in the process switched from Java to Python. Here are the differences that have stood out for me since making the switch. Continue reading

Antifragility and Software Development

Is software antifragile? I think so. I recently finished the book Antifragile – Things that Gain from Disorder by Nassim Nicholas Taleb. I liked it a lot, and I think the ideas in it are quite useful when examining various systems and phenomena. What especially struck me when reading it was how much of it applies to software development. These are the main themes: Continue reading

TDD, Unit Tests and the Passage of Time

Many programmers have a hard time writing good unit-tests for code that involves time. For example, how do you test time-outs, or periodic clean-up jobs? I have seen many tests that create elaborate set-ups with lots of dependencies, or introduce real time gaps, just to be able to test those parts. However, if you structure the code the right way, much of the complexity disappears. Here is an example of a technique that lets you test time-related code with ease. Continue reading

7 Ways More Methods Can Improve Your Program

A lot of code I come across consists of relatively few, but long, methods. The code does what it is supposed to do. However, it could be improved a lot. Refactoring to use more methods can produce better structured programs that are easier to understand, easier to modify, easier to test and easier to debug. Below are 7 reasons why using more methods can be a good idea.

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Great Programmers Write Debuggable Code

All programs need some form of logging built in to them, so we can observe what it is doing. This is especially important when things go wrong. One of the differences between a great programmer and a bad programmer is that a great programmer adds logging and tools that make it easy to debug the program when things fail.

When the program works as expected, there is often no difference in the quality of the logging. However, as soon as the program fails, or you get the wrong result, you can almost immediately tell the good programmers from the bad. Continue reading